New Research Reveals Schizophrenia Causes Due to Abnormal Fatty Metabolism in Brain

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan have discovered a deficiency in the brains of people with schizophrenia that might result in the development of recent drug therapies. A postmortem comparison featured in Schizophrenia Bulletin revealed that schizophrenia was related to lower than normal levels of S1P, a sort of fatty molecule found in the white matter of the brain. Preventing S1P degradation would possibly, therefore, be a brand new path for drug development in treating schizophrenia.

New Research Reveals Schizophrenia Causes Due to Abnormal Fatty Metabolism in Brain

In recent times, drug therapy for schizophrenia has come to a stand-still. Many of the drugs accessible for schizophrenia are based on dopamine, but they’re ineffective in about one out of every three patients. “Because we don’t have another angle on what causes schizophrenia, many pharmaceutical firms are pulling out of schizophrenia-related drug development,” says Takeo Yoshikawa, group head at RIKEN CBS. “Hopefully, our findings can provide a new angle with a new goal for drug development.”

Although schizophrenia is a widely known mental dysfunction that affects the brain, the way it does so remains considerably of a mystery. Scientists have known for a while that the brains of people with schizophrenia have much less white matter than normal brains.

White matter in the brain is made from oligodendrocytes, special cells that wrap across the parts of neurons that carry outgoing signals, which helps them talk with each other. Attribute symptoms of schizophrenia embrace hallucinations and the inability to distinguish reality from fantasy, which might originate in white matter abnormalities that cause irregular communication between neurons.